Category: Pop/Rock

ZZ Top – Tres Hombres

ZZ Top – Tres Hombres       Stephen Thomas Erlewine: ‘ZZ Top – Tres Hombres is the record that brought ZZ Top their first Top Ten record, making them stars in the process. It couldn’t have happened to a better record. ZZ Top finally got their low-down, cheerfully sleazy blooze-n-boogie right on this, their […]

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ZZ Top – Greatest Hits

ZZ Top – Greatest Hits       Stephen Thomas Erlewine: ‘This isn’t a perfect roundup of ZZ Top’s superstar years of the ’80s, but it comes pretty close. It dips back into the ’70s for “Pearl Necklace” and “La Grange,” with a couple of selections from the post-peak ’90s, but this does offer the […]

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Ziggy Marley – Fly Rasta

Ziggy Marley – Fly Rasta       David Jeffries: Coming up on his third decade of making music, Bob Marley’s eldest son Ziggy had already climbed the charts with a series of reggae-pop hits before doing some of that mid-career wandering that artists often do, going off on pleasing larks such as children’s albums […]

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Yuck – Yuck

Yuck – Yuck     Tim Sendra : ‘….The group displays a firm grasp of all the things that make noise pop and/or shoegaze so great, like dynamics, male/female vocal tradeoffs, a bitter romantic lyrical outlook, and tons of pedals and guitars. Yuck is overloaded with loud, fuzzy guitars that whine and grind through the songs, […]

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Young Marble Giants – Colossal Youth

Young Marble Giants – Colossal Youth       Richie Unterberger: ‘ Young Marble Giants – Colossal Youth is a collection of sparse, evocative tunes emphasizing Alison Statton’s floating vocals and minimal guitar/organ/bass/drum machine arrangements. Comparable to little else from its time or since, this is rock music at its most austere. The original album […]

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Yo la Tengo – Fakebook

Yo la Tengo – Fakebook       John Dougan: ‘Recommending Fakebook as the best place to begin a relationship with Yo La Tengo is slightly disingenuous, mainly because Yo La Tengo has never made another record like it, and perhaps never will. So, as completely wonderful as this record is, it’s an accurate representation […]

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Yes – The Yes Album

Yes – The Yes Album Yes – The Yes Album is the third studio album from the English progressive rock band Yes, released on Atlantic Records. It is the last record to feature keyboardist Tony Kaye until 1983, and the first to feature guitarist Steve Howe, who replaced Peter Banks in 1970. The album was […]

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Yes – Fly From Here

      Bruce Eder: ‘A decade after their last studio release, Yes has issued Fly from Here, and it’s not only a keeper, but as good as any record to come from the group since 1974. Consisting here of Chris Squire (bass, vocals), Steve Howe (guitars, vocals), Alan White (drums), Geoff Downes (keyboards), and […]

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Yes – Close To The Edge

Yes – Close To The Edge Dave Thompson: ‘With 1971’s Fragile having left Yes poised quivering on the brink of what friend and foe acknowledged was the peak of the band’s achievement, Close to the Edge was never going to be an easy album to make. Drummer Bill Bruford was already shifting restlessly against Jon […]

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Yes – 90125

Yes – 90125 AMG Review: A stunning self-reinvention by a band that many had given up for dead, 90125 is the album that introduced a whole new generation of listeners to Yes. Begun as Cinema, a new band by Chris Squire and Alan White, the project grew to include the slick production of Trevor Horn, […]

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Yeah Yeah Yeahs – Fever To Tell

Yeah Yeah Yeahs – Fever To Tell Yeah Yeah Yeahs – Fever To Tell is the debut album by Yeah Yeah Yeahs, released on April 29, 2003, through Interscope. It was produced by David Andrew Sitek and mixed by Alan Moulder. Yeah Yeah Yeahs – Fever To Tell was nominated for a Grammy for Best […]

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Woodkid – The Golden Age

Woodkid – The Golden Age AMG Review: It’s beyond cliche to call sweeping, orchestral music “filmic,” but in the case of music video director Yoann Lemoine’s debut album as Woodkid – The Golden Age, the term fits. Though he’s worked with Katy Perry, Taylor Swift, and Lana Del Ray, Lemoine’s own music is more in line […]

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Wolfmother – Wolfmother

Wolfmother – Wolfmother       Stephen Thomas Erlewine: ‘ There’s no denying Australian heavy rock trio Wolfmother has been raised on rock — specifically, raised on ’70s rock. Problem is, from all appearances on their eponymous debut, they made their journey into the past via the twin gateway drugs of the White Stripes and […]

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Wishbone Ash – Argus

Wishbone Ash – Argus AMG Review: If Wishbone Ash can be considered a group who dabbled in the main strains of early-’70s British rock without ever settling on one (were they a prog rock outfit like Yes, a space rock unit like Pink Floyd, a heavy metal ensemble like Led Zeppelin, or just a boogie band […]

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Wire – Pink Flag

Wire – Pink Flag Steve Huey: ‘Perhaps the most original debut album to come out of the first wave of British punk, Wire’s Pink Flag plays like The Ramones Go to Art School — song after song careens past in a glorious, stripped-down rush. However, unlike the Ramones, Wire ultimately made their mark through unpredictability. […]

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Wild Nothing – Nocturne

Wild Nothing – Nocturne Jack Tatum’s Wild Nothing made a pretty impressive showing with its last album, GEMINI. The debut album was a beautiful collection of lo-fi, reverb-drenched dream pop. Comparisons were drawn to The Smiths, The Cure, Joy Division, New Order, and a variety of other 80’s new-wave bands. The comparisons are apt: Tatum’s […]

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Wilco – Yankee Hotel Foxtrot

Wilco – Yankee Hotel Foxtrot AMG Review: Few bands can call themselves contemporaries of both the heartbreakingly earnest self-destruction of Whiskeytown and the alienating experimentation of Radiohead’s post-millennial releases, but on the painstaking Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, Wilco seem to have done just that. In early 2001, the Chicago-area band focused on recording their fourth album, which […]

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Wicked Lady – The Axeman Cometh

Wicked Lady – The Axeman Cometh       Ned Raggett: ‘To say Wicked Lady were an ultimate cult band is almost an understatement — the U.K. power trio’s contemporary reputation was derived solely from a small if committed live fan base. The Axeman Cometh, with original bassist Bob Jeffries, covering selections from 1969 to […]

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Velvet Revolver – Libertad

Velvet Revolver – Libertad Libertad is the second and final studio album by American hard rock band Velvet Revolver, released on July 3, 2007. The name is Spanish and translates to “liberty” or “freedom” in English. According to a 2007 interview with Rolling Stone, along with the Stone Temple Pilots albums Core and Stone Temple […]

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Van Morrison – Moondance

Van Morrison – Moondance Jason Ankeny: ‘The yang to Astral Weeks’ yin, the brilliant Moondance is every bit as much a classic as its predecessor; Van Morrison’s first commercially successful solo effort, it retains the previous album’s deeply spiritual thrust but transcends its bleak, cathartic intensity to instead explore themes of renewal and redemption. Light, […]

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