Category: Prog Rock

Opeth – Heritage

      Thom Jurek: ‘Heritage, Opeth’s tenth studio offering, finds the Swedish band abandoning death metal: no growled vocals, no blistering fast power riffs, no blastbeats. Mixed by Steven Wilson (Porcupine Tree, King Crimson) and engineered by Janne Hansson, Opeth – Heritage is easily Opeth’s most musically adventurous — and indulgent — recording. Written […]

Read More

Yes – Fly From Here

      Bruce Eder: ‘A decade after their last studio release, Yes has issued Fly from Here, and it’s not only a keeper, but as good as any record to come from the group since 1974. Consisting here of Chris Squire (bass, vocals), Steve Howe (guitars, vocals), Alan White (drums), Geoff Downes (keyboards), and […]

Read More

Gryphon – Red Queen to Gryphon Three

      Mike DeGagne: ‘Red Queen to Gryphon Three is only available coupled with the Raindance album on the same disc, but it has stood the test of time as an excellent progressive rock piece. The album centers around a game of chess, with each track around ten minutes in length. The symphonic structure […]

Read More

Uriah Heep – Look at yourself

      Donald A. Guarisco: ‘The third time proved to be the charm for Uriah Heep: on Look at Yourself, the group perfects its fusion of heavy metal power and prog rock majesty, and the result is one of the best albums in the Heep catalog. The gauntlet is thrown down on the title […]

Read More

Paladin – Charge !

Paladin – Charge !       Jo-Ann Greene: ‘Having failed to ignite the populace with their eponymous debut, a set brimming with joie de vivre and creative crossovers, Paladin decided the only way to break into the mainstream was to assault it. And this they set about doing with their sophomore set, 1972’s Charge. […]

Read More

Jethro Tull – Aqualung

Jethro Tull – Aqualung       Rovi Staff : ‘The leap from 1970’s Benefit to the following year’s Aqualung is one of the most astonishing progressions in rock history. In the space of one album, Tull went from relatively unassuming electrified folk-rock to larger-than-life conceptual rock full of sophisticated compositions and complex, intellectual, lyrical constructs. […]

Read More

McDonald and Giles – McDonald and Giles

McDonald and Giles – McDonald and Giles       McDonald and Giles is an album of music released by British musicians Ian McDonald and Michael Giles in 1971. The album was recorded at Island Studios between May and July 1970. Although McDonald and Giles remains popular among King Crimson fans, its commercial success was […]

Read More

Porcupine Tree – Lightbulb Sun

Porcupine Tree – Lightbulb Sun       Ned Raggett: ‘Some older fans looked askance at Lightbulb Sun, feeling it was verging on overt commercialism (and admittedly, the near power ballad solo on “Where We Would Be” is a bit odd!). Then again, given Wilson’s own explorations of avant-garde pop with No-Man, who’s to say […]

Read More

Focus – Moving Waves

Focus – Moving Waves       Paul Collins: ‘The album that boosted Focus into at least semi-fame outside of continental Europe, Moving Waves blasts off with their hit single, “Hocus Pocus.” Built around a killer guitar hook by Jan Akkerman and a series of solo turns by the band, this instrumental replaced “Wipeout” as […]

Read More

Atomic Rooster – In Hearing Of Atomic Rooster

Atomic Rooster – In Hearing Of Atomic Rooster Progarchives: ‘Probably the best progressive album ever produced by a group that no one talks about. In Hearing of Atomic Rooster belts out a broad range of great songs from the fast paced ‘Breakthrough’ the slower and more somber ‘Decision/Indecision’ to the raucous instrumental ‘A Spoonful of […]

Read More

Frost* – Milliontown

Frost* – Milliontown Prograrchives: ‘Simply put, a marvelous release. I can help use only superlatives for this debut album. Excellent musicianship, originality and freshness in aboundance in both rythm, arrangements and melodies, highly solid songwriting, and probably the best production I ever heard. The impression throughout the entire album is to be in the hands […]

Read More

Ange – Au dela du delire

Ange – Au dela du delire Philippe Margotin: ‘Propulsé au sommet du rock symphonique français avec Le Cimetière des arlequins, Ange poursuivait sa route avec ce troisième album, sorti en 1974. Concept-album qui retrace “l’incroyable aventure de Godevin le vilain, qui traversa les siècles avec la connaissance pour devenir premier Noé sans eaux, le roi des […]

Read More

Amplifier – The Octopus

Amplifier – The Octopus     Progarchives: ‘With a sound that is easily associated with fellow Brits Porcupine Tree or Oceansize, Amplifier do manage to take their roots in prog and merge it with a more accessible alternative rock sound to appeal to a demographic beyond the underground progressive music circles. However, despite quite a […]

Read More

Pendragon – The Masquerade Overture

Pendragon – The Masquerade Overture Prognut from Progarchives: ‘Modern Symphonic Progressive Rock as it’s best. This is the ONE to get if you are new to Pendragon. Their best to date. From the beautiful pastoral “Paintbox”, to the Symphonic “Shadow” into the neo-prog “Master of Illusion”. The musicianship is just fantastic. Nick Barrett gives enough […]

Read More

Steven Wilson – Hand Cannot Erase

Steven Wilson Hand Cannot Erase Thom Jurek: ‘In January of 2006, the remains of Joyce Carol Vincent, aged 38, were discovered in her London flat. She died in her apartment in late 2003, surrounded by undelivered Christmas presents. She was described as outgoing, attractive, and ambitious by neighbors, friends, and family, but somehow wasn’t missed. […]

Read More

Steven Wilson – The Raven That Refused to Sing

Steven Wilson – The Raven That Refused to Sing       Thom Jurek ‘Over the past decade, Steven Wilson’s relationship with prog rock over has grown increasingly intimate. He previewed a killer new band on the live album Get All You Deserve — woodwind/multi-instrumentalist Theo Travis, keyboardist Adam Holzman, session bass and stick player […]

Read More

Genesis – Foxtrot

Genesis – Foxtrot Stephen Thomas Erlewine: ‘Foxtrot is where Genesis began to pull all of its varied inspirations into a cohesive sound — which doesn’t necessarily mean that the album is streamlined, for this is a group that always was grandiose even when they were cohesive, or even when they rocked, which they truly do […]

Read More

Emerson, Lake & Palmer – Emerson, Lake & Palmer

Emerson, Lake & Palmer – Emerson, Lake & Palmer Bruce Eder  ‘Lively, ambitious, almost entirely successful debut album, made up of keyboard-dominated instrumentals (“The Barbarian,” “Three Fates”) and romantic ballads (“Lucky Man”) showcasing all three members’ very daunting talents. This album, which reached the Top 20 in America and got to number four in England, […]

Read More

Genesis – Wind & Wuthering

Genesis – Wind & Wuthering Stephen Thomas Erlewine ‘Wind & Wuthering followed quickly on the heels of A Trick of the Tail and they’re very much cut from the same cloth, working the same English eccentric ground that was the group’s stock in trade since Trespass. But if A Trick of the Tail played like […]

Read More

Harmonium – Si On Avait Besoin D’une Cinquième Sainson

Harmonium – Si On Avait Besoin D’une Cinquième Sainson Folk prog masters from Canada HARMONIUM released several brilliant albums in the 70’s with “Si on avait…” representing perhaps my favourite of all of thier releases. HARMONIUM’s music tends to resonate on the light side of things with its brilliant and crisp piano accents and happy […]

Read More