Category: Soft Rock/Folk Rock

Palace Brothers – There is no-one what will take care of you

Palace Brothers – There is no-one what will take care of you       Mark Deming: ‘Will Oldham’s first album under the Palace rubric, There Is No-One What Will Take Care of You, seemed to emerge from under a cloud of mystery on its first release in 1993. The first edition had no credits […]

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Ray LaMontagne – Ouroboros

Ray LaMontagne – Ouroboros       Marcy Donelson: ‘… . For his sixth full-length, Ouroboros, the singer/songwriter selected My Morning Jacket’s Jim James to co-produce, and moves deeper into the psychedelic haze. LaMontagne shuts down vocal comparisons to Van Morrison here, almost completely abandoning his soulful growl with the exception of parts of “While […]

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John Martyn – Cooltide

John Martyn – Cooltide       Rob Caldwell: After releasing the much-delayed The Apprentice, Martyn was once again on a roll, and, while not quite as strong as The Apprentice, Cooltide was a solid outing. His jazziest release yet, it’s marred slightly by a gravelly hoarseness in his voice, which makes him sound like […]

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Simon and Garfunkel – Sound of Silence

Simon and Garfunkel – Sound of Silence       Bruce Eder: Simon & Garfunkel’s second album, Sounds of Silence, was recorded 18 months after their debut long-player, Wednesday Morning, 3 AM — but even though the two albums shared one song (actually, one-and-a-half songs) in common, the sound here seemed a million miles away […]

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Benjamin Francis Leftwich – Last Smoke Before the Snowstorm

Benjamin Francis Leftwich – Last Smoke Before the Snowstorm       Jon O’Brien: “…Benjamin Francis Leftwich couldn’t have picked a better time to unleash, or rather quietly release, his subtle and understated brand of acoustic balladry. Produced by Ian Grimble (Manic Street Preachers), his debut album, Last Smoke Before the Snowstorm, won’t exactly be […]

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Nick Drake – Made To Love Magic

Nick Drake – Made To Love Magic       Hunger for “new” Nick Drake material had reached enough of a fever pitch by the 21st century for Island to try digging up enough for this odd patchwork collection, combining outtakes with remixes of tracks that had been previously issued on the Time of No […]

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Hozier – Hozier

      Timothy Monger: ‘The recipient of much hype and praise for his breakthrough single “Take Me to Church,” Ireland’s Hozier does plenty to back it up on his self-titled debut LP. A soulful voice and a brooding mystique can get you a long way but fortunately, most of the material here is well-written […]

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Jackson C Frank – Jackson C Frank

Jackson C Frank – Jackson C Frank       Bruce Eder: ‘Jackson C. Frank’s original 1965 album is a lost classic, daringly complex and honest, filled with virtuoso playing that is all the more impressive for the offhanded way that Frank makes it look so easy. There is a convergence of elements here that […]

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Van Morrison – Moondance

Van Morrison – Moondance Jason Ankeny: ‘The yang to Astral Weeks’ yin, the brilliant Moondance is every bit as much a classic as its predecessor; Van Morrison’s first commercially successful solo effort, it retains the previous album’s deeply spiritual thrust but transcends its bleak, cathartic intensity to instead explore themes of renewal and redemption. Light, […]

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Passenger – Whispers

Passenger – Whispers Matt Collar: ‘British singer/songwriter Mike Rosenberg, otherwise known as Passenger, continues exploring the broader sonic palette he developed on 2012’s All the Little Lights with his sixth studio album, 2014’s Whispers. As he did last time, Rosenberg once again teamed up with All the Little Lights producer Chris Vallejo. Together, they deliver […]

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John Prine – John Prine

John Prine – John Prine A brilliant folk songwriter whose sly humor, melancholy tales, and easy vocal style earned him great renown (and many covers) among his fellow performers. William Ruhlmann: ”A revelation upon its release, this album is now a collection of standards: “Illegal Smile,” “Hello in There,” “Sam Stone,” “Donald and Lydia,” and, […]

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Jefferson Airplane – Surrealistic pillow

      Bruce Eder: ‘The second album by Jefferson Airplane, Surrealistic Pillow was a groundbreaking piece of folk-rock-based psychedelia, and it hit like a shot heard round the world; where the later efforts from bands like the Grateful Dead, Quicksilver Messenger Service, and especially, the Charlatans, were initially not too much more than cult […]

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Stephen Bishop – Careless

      Lindsay Planer ‘Even before Stephen Bishop (guitar, trombone, vocals) issued his debut long-player, Careless, in 1978, he’d already become a music industry insider. Bishop was discovered by Art Garfunkel in the 1970s as a publisher, where he penned songs for a diversity of artists ranging from Barbra Streisand to the Four Tops. […]

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Low Roar – Low Roar

 Low Roar – Low Roar Low Roar’s dreamy folk finds beauty in the somber side of life. Formerly the frontman of Oakland, California alt-rockers Audrye Sessions, Ryan Joseph Karazija began Low Roar as a response to the change and loneliness he felt in the wake of moving to Reykjavík, Iceland. He chronicled the challenges of […]

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George Harrison – Best of Dark Horse

George Harrison – Best of Dark Horse Best of Dark Horse 1976–1989 is George Harrison’s second official compilation album and was released in 1989. It follows up on both his successful comeback album Cloud Nine in 1987 and the Harrison-led Traveling Wilburys Vol. 1 the following year, also a big seller. George material. Favorites of […]

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Lee Hazlewood – Requiem for an Almost Lady

      This album was advertised as “the heaviest breakup album ever made” when I decided to buy it, the advertising was right on the money. It’s a brilliantly honest record, sparingly arranged, quite beautiful, angry, sad, and depressing, all at the same time. This sublime collection consists of 10 short, simple, economically orchestrated […]

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Noah Gundersen – Ledges

Noah Gundersen – Ledges       Steve Leggett : ‘Born into a musical but very religious family, Noah Gundersen didn’t hear many secular songs as a child, perhaps explaining the subtle and hushed gospel intensity and sincerity he brings to his songs, which, while definitely secular, deal with themes of loss, hope, and personal […]

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Devendra Banhart – Mala

Devendra Banhart – Mala AMG Review: At a certain point, the path got stranger for Devendra Banhart. Appearing out of nowhere in the early 2000s with a string of almost accidentally perfect albums, Banhart’s haunted voice and familiar impressions of the ghosts of folksingers past pushed him to the forefront of what would be dubbed freak […]

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Joan Baez – Sings Dylan

Joan Baez – Sings Dylan     Matt Fink:  ‘Culling 15 tracks from her 1968 release of Any Day Now and adding five tracks taken from her releases of the early ’60s, Vanguard Sessions: Joan Baez – Sings Dylan is a wonderful example of Joan Baez’s ability to transcend the work of other songwriters. Though it could […]

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Mostly Autumn – Music Inspired By Th Lord Of The Rings

Mostly Autumn – Music Inspired By Th Lord Of The Rings Music Inspired by the Lord of the Rings is the fourth studio album by Mostly Autumn. The music is not inspired by the book by Tolkien, but was made because the first movie of the filmcycle The Lord of the Rings film trilogy was […]

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