Category: Pop/Rock

The Drums – Portamento

      Heather Phares: ‘Ever since the success of their first single “Let’s Go Surfing,” the Drums have spent equal amounts of time tracing that song’s sound and distancing themselves from it. They continue to do so on Portamento, beginning their second album with a pair of jaunty kiss-offs to religion and exes. …  . However, […]

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Pretenders – The Singles

Pretenders – The Singles       The Singles is The Pretenders’ 1987 compilation album and features all the band’s UK single hits to that date, as well as including “I Got You Babe” which Chrissie Hynde had performed with UB40 in 1985. The album reached #69 in the US album chart and #6 in […]

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Buggles – The Age of Plastic

Buggles – The Age of Plastic AMG review: The fun, quirky single “Video Killed the Radio Star” garnered The Buggles international attention in 1980, but it was just one of The Age of Plastic’s fascinating, futuristic visions. From the title track’s opening strains, Trevor Horn and Geoff Downes transform your living room into a world […]

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The Stone Roses – The Stone Roses

The Stone Roses – The Stone Roses       Stephen Thomas Erlewine: ‘Since the Stone Roses were the nominal leaders of Britain’s “Madchester” scene — an indie rock phenomenon that fused guitar pop with drug-fueled rave and dance culture — it’s rather ironic that their eponymous debut only hints at dance music. What made […]

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The Lumineers – The Lumineers

The Lumineers – The Lumineers The Lumineers are a folk rock band, based in Denver, Colorado. The two founding members and songwriters of the Lumineers are Wesley Schultz (lead vocals, guitar) and Jeremiah Fraites (drums, percussion). Schultz and Fraites began writing and performing together in New Jersey in 2005. Neyla Pekarek (cello, vocals) joined the […]

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Phideaux – Snowtorch

Phideaux – Snowtorch Proarchives: Phideaux hasn’t lost his sense of mystery throughout Snowtorch, and he hasn’t lost his sense of melody. …Phideaux – Snowtorch is more piano/ vintage keys oriented, with less guitars but more flute and cello. It’s the HUGE palette of keyboards that had me: colorful variety that reminded me the great years […]

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Peter Tosh – Legalize It

      Vik Iyengar: After years of being overshadowed by Bob Marley, Peter Tosh left the Wailers to pursue a solo career. Released in 1976, Legalize It is a bold statement that Peter Tosh had arrived and was a creative force in his own right. Although he explores some issues of spirituality, this is […]

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Suicide – Suicide

Suicide – Suicide AMG Review: Proof that punk was more about attitude than a raw, guitar-driven sound, Suicide’s self-titled debut set the duo apart from the rest of the style’s self-proclaimed outsiders. Over the course of seven songs, Martin Rev’s dense, unnerving electronics — including a menacing synth bass, a drum machine that sounds like […]

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The Grateful Dead – American Beauty

The Grateful Dead – American Beauty AMG Review: With 1970’s Workingman’s Dead, the Grateful Dead went through an overnight metamorphosis, turning abruptly from tripped-out free-form rock toward sublime acoustic folk and Americana. Taking notes on vocal harmonies from friends Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, the Dead used the softer statements of their fourth studio album […]

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Elephant Stone – Elephant Stone

Elephant Stone – Elephant Stone AMG Review: For modern rock fans the very name Elephant Stone connotes something specific: a beloved 1988 single from the Stone Roses. The new millennial, Canadian psych rock band Elephant Stone does indeed take elements from the Stone Roses, specifically how the Manchester group layered acoustic guitars and ringing Rickenbackers […]

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Alex Turner – Submarine

Alex Turner – Submarine AMG Review: Alex Turner’s soundtrack to Submarine, the first film by director Richard Ayoade, finds the Arctic Monkeys frontman exploring yet another avenue that’s quite different from his regular gig. With the Last Shadow Puppets, Turner had the chance to explore Baroque ‘60s pop, and here he gets intimate, often just strumming […]

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The Cure – Staring at the Sea

The Cure – Staring at the Sea       Stephen Thomas Erlewine: ‘Staring at the Sea: The Singles collects all of the Cure’s biggest U.K. hits and best-known songs from the late ’70s and early ’80s. Spanning from “Killing an Arab” and “Boys Don’t Cry,” to “The Lovecats,” “In Between Days,” and “Close to […]

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Canned Heat – Boogie with Canned Heat

Canned Heat – Boogie with Canned Heat       Lindsay Planer: “Canned Heat’s second long-player, Boogie With Canned Heat (1968), pretty well sums up the bona fide blend of amplified late-’60s electric rhythm and blues, with an expressed emphasis on loose and limber boogie-woogie. The quintet — consisting of Alan “Blind Owl” Wilson (guitar/harmonica/vocals), […]

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Hatfield and the North – Hatfield and the North

Hatfield and the North – Hatfield and the North AMG Review: One of the Canterbury scene’s most revered bands, Hatfield and the North made up for the brevity of their career with some fascinating music. Always adventurous, the quartet had the keen sense to realize that only the most hardened jazz fans respond to numerous […]

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The Cars – Candy-O

The Cars – Candy-O       Greg Prato: ‘ Since the Cars had created a perfect album with their 1978 self-titled debut, it would be nearly impossible to top it. Instead of laboring long and hard over a follow-up like many ’70s bands did after a huge commercial success, the band cranked out their sophomore […]

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Wicked Lady – The Axeman Cometh

Wicked Lady – The Axeman Cometh       Ned Raggett: ‘To say Wicked Lady were an ultimate cult band is almost an understatement — the U.K. power trio’s contemporary reputation was derived solely from a small if committed live fan base. The Axeman Cometh, with original bassist Bob Jeffries, covering selections from 1969 to […]

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The Mamas and The Papas – If You Can Beleive Your Eyes And Ears

The Mamas and The Papas – If You Can Beleive Your Eyes And Ears AMG Review: In the spring of 1966, If You Can Believe Your Eyes and Ears represented a genuinely new sound, as fresh to listeners as the songs on Meet the Beatles had seemed two years earlier. Released just as “California Dreaming” […]

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Motley Crue – Dr. Feelgood

      Alex Henderson: ‘Mötley Crüe’s albums were a lot like episodes of Married with Children — they may not be great works of art, but they can be darn entertaining. With Bob Rock serving as producer, the L.A. headbangers savored the joys of trashy, unapologetically decadent fun on Dr. Feelgood — an album […]

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The Ramones – Rocket To Russia

      Stephen Thomas Erlewine: ‘The Ramones provided the blueprint and Leave Home duplicated it with lesser results, but the Ramones’ third album, Rocket to Russia, perfected it. Rocket to Russia boasts a cleaner production than its predecessors, which only gives the Ramones’ music more force. It helps that the group wrote its finest […]

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Jackson Browne – For Everyman

Jackson Browne – For Everyman       William Ruhlmann: ‘Jackson Browne faced the nearly insurmountable task of following a masterpiece in making his second album. Having cherry-picked years of songwriting the first time around, he turned to some of his secondary older material, which was still better than most people’s best and, ironically, more […]

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