Category: Punk/New Wave

Wire – Pink Flag

Wire – Pink Flag Steve Huey: ‘Perhaps the most original debut album to come out of the first wave of British punk, Wire’s Pink Flag plays like The Ramones Go to Art School — song after song careens past in a glorious, stripped-down rush. However, unlike the Ramones, Wire ultimately made their mark through unpredictability. […]

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Devo – Q: Are We Not Men? A: We Are Devo!

Devo – Q: Are We Not Men? A: We Are Devo!       Steve Huey: ‘Produced by Brian Eno, Q: Are We Not Men? A: We Are Devo! was a seminal touchstone in the development of American new wave. It was one of the first pop albums to use synthesizers as an important textural […]

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Buzzcocks – Singles Going Steady

      ‘Ned Raggett’: If Never Mind the Bollocks and London Calling are held up as punk masterpieces, then there’s no question that Singles Going Steady belongs alongside them. In fact, the slew of astonishing seven-inches collected on Steady and their influence on future musicians – punk or otherwise — sometimes even betters more […]

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The Modern Lovers – The Modern Lovers

The Modern Lovers – The Modern Lovers The Modern Lovers is the first album recorded by the Boston-based band the Modern Lovers. It was released on Beserkley Records in 1976, although the original nine tracks had been recorded in 1972. Six of the original tracks were produced by John Cale. In 2003, the album was […]

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Blondie – Atomic – The Very Best Of Blondie

Blondie – Atomic – The Very Best Of Blondie       Andy Kellman: ‘Atomic: The Very Best of Blondie is a two-disc compilation with a spotty best-of on one disc and a collection of remixes on another. Disc one is a satisfactory overview, containing most of the group’s biggest and best hits — “Atomic,” […]

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Suicide – Suicide

Suicide – Suicide AMG Review: Proof that punk was more about attitude than a raw, guitar-driven sound, Suicide’s self-titled debut set the duo apart from the rest of the style’s self-proclaimed outsiders. Over the course of seven songs, Martin Rev’s dense, unnerving electronics — including a menacing synth bass, a drum machine that sounds like […]

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The Cars – Candy-O

The Cars – Candy-O       Greg Prato: ‘ Since the Cars had created a perfect album with their 1978 self-titled debut, it would be nearly impossible to top it. Instead of laboring long and hard over a follow-up like many ’70s bands did after a huge commercial success, the band cranked out their sophomore […]

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Siouxsie and the Banshees – Juju

Siouxsie and the Banshees – Juju AMG Review: One of the band’s masterworks, Juju sees Siouxsie and the Banshees operating in a squalid wall of sound dominated by tribal drums, swirling and piercing guitars, and Siouxsie Sioux’s fractured art-attack vocals. If not for John McGeoch’s marvelous high-pitched guitars, here as reminiscent of Joy Division as […]

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The Specials – The Specials

The Specials – The Specials AMG Review: A perfect moment in time captured on vinyl forever, such is the Specials’ eponymous debut album; it arrived in shops in the middle of October 1979 and soared into the U.K. Top Five. It was an utter revelation — except for anyone who had seen the band on-stage, […]

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Pere Ubu – The Modern Dance

Pere Ubu – The Modern Dance AMG Review: There isn’t a Pere Ubu recording you can imagine living without. The Modern Dance remains the essential Ubu purchase (as does the follow-up, Dub Housing). For sure, Mercury had no idea what they had on their hands when they released this as part of their punk rock […]

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Magazine – Real Life

Magazine – Real Life AMG Review : Howard Devoto had the foresight to promote two infamous Sex Pistols concerts in Manchester, and his vision was no less acute when he left Buzzcocks after recording Spiral Scratch. Possibly sensing the festering of punk’s clichés and limitations, and unquestionably not taken by the movement’s beginnings, he bailed — […]

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Television – Marquee Moon

Television – Marquee Moon Marquee Moon is the debut album by American punk rock band Television. It was released on February 8, 1977, by Elektra Records. While often considered a seminal work to emerge from the New York punk scene of the mid-to-late 1970s, Television – Marquee Moon differed from conventional punk in its textured, guitar-based […]

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