Tag: 1970-1973

Badfinger – Straight Up

Badfinger – Straight Up       Stephen Thomas Erlewine: ‘Straight Up winds up somewhat less dynamic than No Dice, largely because that record alternated its rockers, pop tunes, and ballads. Here, everything is at a similar level, as the ballads are made grander and the rockers have their melodic side emphasized. Consequently, the record […]

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Bob Marley – African Herbsman

Bob Marley – African Herbsman       Matthew Hilburn: ‘To Bob Marley’s emotionally charged music and lyrics, add the tight riddims and harmonies of the Wailers and then put all of that talent into the ceaselessly creative hands of production wizard Lee “Scratch” Perry. What you get is a 16-track reggae masterpiece capturing what […]

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Faces – First Step

      Stephen Thomas Erlewine: ‘The notorious sloppiness of the Faces was apparent on their debut, almost moreso on the cover than on the music, as the group was stilled billed as the Small Faces on this 1970 debut although without Steve Marriott in front, and with Rod Stewart and Ron Wood in tow, […]

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Big Star – #1 Record

      William Ruhlmann: ‘The problem with coming in late on an artwork lauded as “influential” is that you’ve probably encountered the work it influenced first, so its truly innovative qualities are lost. Thus, if you are hearing Big Star’s debut album for the first time decades after its release (as, inevitably, most people […]

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Uriah Heep – Look at yourself

      Donald A. Guarisco: ‘The third time proved to be the charm for Uriah Heep: on Look at Yourself, the group perfects its fusion of heavy metal power and prog rock majesty, and the result is one of the best albums in the Heep catalog. The gauntlet is thrown down on the title […]

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Paladin – Charge !

Paladin – Charge !       Jo-Ann Greene: ‘Having failed to ignite the populace with their eponymous debut, a set brimming with joie de vivre and creative crossovers, Paladin decided the only way to break into the mainstream was to assault it. And this they set about doing with their sophomore set, 1972’s Charge. […]

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Jethro Tull – Aqualung

Jethro Tull – Aqualung       Rovi Staff : ‘The leap from 1970’s Benefit to the following year’s Aqualung is one of the most astonishing progressions in rock history. In the space of one album, Tull went from relatively unassuming electrified folk-rock to larger-than-life conceptual rock full of sophisticated compositions and complex, intellectual, lyrical constructs. […]

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McDonald and Giles – McDonald and Giles

McDonald and Giles – McDonald and Giles       McDonald and Giles is an album of music released by British musicians Ian McDonald and Michael Giles in 1971. The album was recorded at Island Studios between May and July 1970. Although McDonald and Giles remains popular among King Crimson fans, its commercial success was […]

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Focus – Moving Waves

Focus – Moving Waves       Paul Collins: ‘The album that boosted Focus into at least semi-fame outside of continental Europe, Moving Waves blasts off with their hit single, “Hocus Pocus.” Built around a killer guitar hook by Jan Akkerman and a series of solo turns by the band, this instrumental replaced “Wipeout” as […]

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Atomic Rooster – In Hearing Of Atomic Rooster

Atomic Rooster – In Hearing Of Atomic Rooster Progarchives: ‘Probably the best progressive album ever produced by a group that no one talks about. In Hearing of Atomic Rooster belts out a broad range of great songs from the fast paced ‘Breakthrough’ the slower and more somber ‘Decision/Indecision’ to the raucous instrumental ‘A Spoonful of […]

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Syd Barrett – The Madcap Laughs

Syd Barrett – The Madcap Laughs     Stewart Mason: ‘Wisely, The Madcap Laughs doesn’t even try to sound like a consistent record. Half the album was recorded by Barrett’s former bandmates Roger Waters and Dave Gilmour, and the other half by Harvest Records head Malcolm Jones. Surprisingly, Jones’ tracks are song for song much […]

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Van Morrison – Moondance

Van Morrison – Moondance Jason Ankeny: ‘The yang to Astral Weeks’ yin, the brilliant Moondance is every bit as much a classic as its predecessor; Van Morrison’s first commercially successful solo effort, it retains the previous album’s deeply spiritual thrust but transcends its bleak, cathartic intensity to instead explore themes of renewal and redemption. Light, […]

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Vangelis – L’Apocalypse des Animaux

Vangelis – L’Apocalypse des Animaux This album is one of Vangelis’ earliest works, recorded whilst still a member of progressive rock band Aphrodite’s Child. It also marks the first time that he collaborated with French director Frédéric Rossif on soundtracks relating to his TV documentary programmes. Though the album itself was released in 1973, the […]

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John Prine – John Prine

John Prine – John Prine A brilliant folk songwriter whose sly humor, melancholy tales, and easy vocal style earned him great renown (and many covers) among his fellow performers. William Ruhlmann: ”A revelation upon its release, this album is now a collection of standards: “Illegal Smile,” “Hello in There,” “Sam Stone,” “Donald and Lydia,” and, […]

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Genesis – Foxtrot

Genesis – Foxtrot Stephen Thomas Erlewine: ‘Foxtrot is where Genesis began to pull all of its varied inspirations into a cohesive sound — which doesn’t necessarily mean that the album is streamlined, for this is a group that always was grandiose even when they were cohesive, or even when they rocked, which they truly do […]

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Hawkwind – Space Ritual

Hawkwind – Space Ritual Wilson Neate: ‘Recorded live in December 1972 and released the following year, Space Ritual is an excellent document of Hawkwind’s classic lineup, underscoring the group’s status as space rock pioneers. As the quintessential “people’s band,” Hawkwind carried ’60s countercultural idealism into the ’70s, gigging constantly, playing wherever there was an audience, […]

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Slade – Slayed?

Slade – Slayed? Dave Thompson ‘Slade might have built its everywhere-but-America fame upon a succession of gut-tearing hit singles, but the band’s true rocking credentials were on display elsewhere, in the second to none stage show that had already been preserved on the epochal Slade Alive! earlier in 1972 and across the chain of storming […]

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Emerson, Lake & Palmer – Emerson, Lake & Palmer

Emerson, Lake & Palmer – Emerson, Lake & Palmer Bruce Eder  ‘Lively, ambitious, almost entirely successful debut album, made up of keyboard-dominated instrumentals (“The Barbarian,” “Three Fates”) and romantic ballads (“Lucky Man”) showcasing all three members’ very daunting talents. This album, which reached the Top 20 in America and got to number four in England, […]

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Billy Cobham – Spectrum

Billy Cobham – Spectrum Spectrum is the debut album by jazz fusion drummer Billy Cobham. The album contains much influence of the music of Miles Davis and Mahavishnu Orchestra, with whom Cobham had previously collaborated extensively. Tommy Bolin, who would go on to join the hard rock band Deep Purple two years later, plays the […]

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Robert Fripp & Brian Eno – No Pussyfooting

Robert Fripp & Brian Eno – No Pussyfooting ‘Ted Mills’ :  At the same time Brian Eno was working on Here Come the Warm Jets, he was flexing his experimental muscle with this album of tape delay manipulation recorded with Robert Fripp. In a system later to be dubbed Frippertronics, Eno and Fripp set up […]

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