Tag: 77

The Marshall Tucker Band – Carolina Dreams

The Marshall Tucker Band – Carolina Dreams       Carolina Dreams, released in 1977, was The Marshall Tucker Band’s sixth album and an ode to the band’s home state, South Carolina, USA. Focusing on Western themes, it spawned their biggest hit to date, “Heard It In a Love Song”, which rose to #14 on […]

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Wire – Pink Flag

Wire – Pink Flag Steve Huey: ‘Perhaps the most original debut album to come out of the first wave of British punk, Wire’s Pink Flag plays like The Ramones Go to Art School — song after song careens past in a glorious, stripped-down rush. However, unlike the Ramones, Wire ultimately made their mark through unpredictability. […]

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David Bowie – Heroes

David Bowie – Heroes     Stephen Thomas Erlewine: ‘Repeating the formula of Low’s half-vocal/half-instrumental structure, Heroes develops and strengthens the sonic innovations David Bowie and Brian Eno explored on their first collaboration. The vocal songs are fuller, boasting harder rhythms and deeper layers of sound. Much of the harder-edged sound of Heroes is due […]

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Bob Marley & The Wailers ‎- Exodus

Bob Marley & The Wailers ‎- Exodus Exodus is the ninth studio album by Jamaican reggae recording band Bob Marley and the Wailers, first released 3 June 1977 though Island Records. With the other original members leaving the group, Marley recruited a new backing band. Their first major success was Rastaman Vibration (1976). On 3 […]

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The Clash – The Clash

The Clash – The Clash       Stephen Thomas Erlewine: ‘the Clash’s eponymous debut album was pure, unadulterated rage and fury, fueled by passion for both rock & roll and revolution. Though the cliché about punk rock was that the bands couldn’t play, the key to the Clash is that although they gave that […]

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Suicide – Suicide

Suicide – Suicide AMG Review: Proof that punk was more about attitude than a raw, guitar-driven sound, Suicide’s self-titled debut set the duo apart from the rest of the style’s self-proclaimed outsiders. Over the course of seven songs, Martin Rev’s dense, unnerving electronics — including a menacing synth bass, a drum machine that sounds like […]

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The Ramones – Rocket To Russia

      Stephen Thomas Erlewine: ‘The Ramones provided the blueprint and Leave Home duplicated it with lesser results, but the Ramones’ third album, Rocket to Russia, perfected it. Rocket to Russia boasts a cleaner production than its predecessors, which only gives the Ramones’ music more force. It helps that the group wrote its finest […]

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The Sex Pistols – NeverMind The Bollocks

The Sex Pistols – NeverMind The Bollocks AMG Review: While mostly accurate, dismissing Never Mind the Bollocks as merely a series of loud, ragged midtempo rockers with a harsh, grating vocalist and not much melody would be a terrible error. Already anthemic songs are rendered positively transcendent by Johnny Rotten’s rabid, foaming delivery. His bitterly […]

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Giorgio Moroder – From Here To Eternity

Giorgio Moroder – From Here To Eternity From Here to Eternity is a 1977 album composed, produced and performed by Giorgio Moroder. In the production credits, it is stated that “only electronic keyboards were used in the making of this album.” The first part of the album is a nonstop dance mix that has been […]

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Michael Franks – Sleeping Gypsy

Michael Franks – Sleeping Gypsy Sleeping Gypsy is a jazz vocal album by Michael Franks, released in 1977 with Warner Bros. Records. It was Franks’ third studio album after The Art of Tea and prior to Burchfield Nines. AMG Review; After the success of The Art of Tea, Michael Franks was able to more confidently move […]

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Foreigner – Foreigner

Foreigner – Foreigner AMG Review: Although punk rock’s furious revolution threatened to overthrow rock’s old guard in 1977, bands like Foreigner came along and proved that there was plenty of room in the marketplace for both the violent, upstart minimalism of punk and the airbrushed slickness of what would be called “arena rock.” Along with […]

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Klaus Schulze – Mirage

Klaus Schulze – Mirage AMG Review: Mirage is one of Klaus Schulze’s best albums. It is certainly among the eeriest e-music sets ever. He created it as “an electronic winter landscape dedicated to Hans Dieter Schulze.” It has somewhat of a symphonic structure. There are two main pieces: “Velvet Voyage” and “Crystal Lake.” Each piece […]

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Circus – Movin’ On

Circus – Movin’ On Progarchives.com: Circus is a not very well known progressive rock band. On Circus – Movin’ On, it seems no keyboards are used, but it is very hard to believe! The influences seems come from everywhere, as i am going to explain below. When you think about influences, then comes to mind […]

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Brian Eno – Before And After Science

Brian Eno – Before And After Science AMG Review: Brian Eno – Before And After Science is really a study of “studio composition” whereby recordings are created by deconstruction and elimination: tracks are recorded and assembled in layers, then selectively subtracted one after another, resulting in a composition and sound quite unlike that at the […]

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Jackson Browne – Running on Empty

Jackson Browne – Running on Empty AMG Review: Having acknowledged a certain creative desperation on The Pretender, Jackson Browne lowered his sights (and raised his commercial appeal) considerably with Jackson Browne – Running on Empty, which was more a concept album about the road than an actual live album, even though its songs were sometimes […]

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Anthony Phillips – The Geese and The Ghost

Anthony Phillips – The Geese and The Ghost AMG review:  Anthony Phillips’ first post-Genesis solo album: Anthony Phillips – The Geese and The Ghost was an extension of the pseudo-medieval folk elements found on Trespass, the last of his Genesis albums. Much of this recording sounds like a lost Genesis album, understandable since Phil Collins […]

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Television – Marquee Moon

Television – Marquee Moon Marquee Moon is the debut album by American punk rock band Television. It was released on February 8, 1977, by Elektra Records. While often considered a seminal work to emerge from the New York punk scene of the mid-to-late 1970s, Television – Marquee Moon differed from conventional punk in its textured, guitar-based […]

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